Fibromyalgia and Dysphasia



I am struggling horrendously at the moment with processing words.

Do you ever feel this way when words that you have used as part of an adult vocabulary seem suddenly alien to your mind?

This can be a symptom of Fibromyalgia and fibro fog that is rarely discussed. People often think Fibromyalgia to be all about pain and chronic fatigue. If they are aware of the term Fibro fog they view it as simply a fuzzy head.

It can be quite frightening if you are unsure what is happening to you.
Imagine how you would feel if suddenly you can not think of simple words. You struggle to form a sentence in the correct order or you have difficulty understanding words.

I get this when writing, I hit a total block. Even on good days writing is such a long process now. But it is not just with blogging it is real life also, I notice it so much.

For me, it is one of the difficult symptoms associated with Fibromyalgia.
The correct medical term is Dysphasia.



Dysphasia is the medical term for difficulty in finding the right words or forming sentences. It can be caused by a head injury, stroke, and many other things. 

Dysphasia can be:

  • Receptive - difficulty comprehending words. 
  • Expressive - difficulty stringing words together to make meaningful sentences or even in the correct order.

The medical profession are unsure why people with Fibromyalgia have difficulties with cognitive function. A few theories have been passed about from the blood flow to the brain and also defects in the central nervous system. Some doctors claim it runs parallel with sensory overload while some claim it is all a result of chronic pain.



There is no medication to correct this symptom but you can help the process. For many people, this can be achieved by managing pain and plenty of rest.

Sometimes just time out from thinking about words is calming.

Some people claim great results with Vitamin B and Omega oils claiming they improve cognitive function.

I personally find meditation is great as a coping mechanism. It is like a daily defrag of your minds contents.


Do you struggle also with reading?

Trust me you are not alone. Due to this inability to process words I can no longer read long books. I literally get lost in books and not in a good way!

Books were once for relaxation, now they just cause so much stress and frustration. 



The boys are so used to me getting words wrong or in the wrong sequence. It was only today in the park I said a sentence that came out jumbled, my son just hugged me and said, "Mum, you are cute."

I am fine with loved one but it is quite embarrassing outside of my small circle.


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When I first started with these symptoms I thought I was losing my mind. I now know it is perfectly normal and there are many of us with Fibromyalgia that has difficulty with this.

Don't ever feel you are alone.

 Love and gentle hugs to you all

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Comments

  1. Total "brain fogger" here, and I can completely relate. I don't even try to tell jokes anymore because I end up telling the punchline first LOL. I think mine has a lot to do with either sensory overload, like you mentioned, or putting a lot of pressure on what I'm about to say and how I want to get my point across because I want my words to mean something--I want to be heard. Especially since I don't get out a lot or have many friends. For me, one thing that has helped is trying to relax my posture while I'm talking so I can relax my mind (sounds weird but it somehow just puts my mind at ease). Other solutions that I wouldn't have previously tried for anxiety have helped me as well, and I'm thankful for them. Reading and writing have always been passions of mine, and I can't express how depressing it's been for me to have brain fog get in the way of my enjoyment of them. I used to be able to read a page and keep going; now it seems I have to re-read a paragraph several times to grasp what is going on. At least I'm still doing what I love, though!

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    1. Hello my love, I often find it odd to say how comforting someones distress is but I really do feel comfort reading your words and knowing I am not alone. Huge hugs Ness xxx

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  2. Oh God, I thought I had early dementia when it started to get bad. I've always muddled words but after a stroke it got worse. My daughter told the Dr that my brain turned to mashed potatoes when she was little!
    Oddly enough I'm OK reading and not too bad typing. It's nearly all verbal for me so I tend to be a lot quieter than I used to be.
    Sadly, my daughter already has this aged 9. When she gets the trigeminal pain in her face from her neck trigger points her first warning is that she can't talk, then her eye goes blurred. I really worry about her. She's an A student in English and wants to be a fantasy author. I pray it doesn't progress beyond verbal with her.
    Nothing stops it in m6 experience. Both me and Meg need to sleep until we wake naturally for it to ease off, if we're lucky.
    Spoonerism is an ironic word for us! 😀

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    1. Oh me too Cathy it was scary! So sorry your little girl has it also, so sad but how lovely that her Mum completely understands. Massive love to you both Ness xxx

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  3. I have a friend who struggles with dysphasia. I had no idea it was a fibro fog symptom!

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    1. Hi Brittany, yes scary at the time but glad it was all related. Not everyone gets it thankfully. Love and hugs Ness xxx

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  4. I love this! I can identify with it so much. I really miss reading. It used to be one of my chief joys in life. Now, I struggle to read a blog post. Thank you for putting into words one of the things that I struggle with most on a daily basis. Blessings, Valerie

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    1. Hello Valerie, massive hugs for being like me. It is always comforting knowing we are not alone Love and hugs Ness xxx

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  5. Brain fog is SO frustrating. It was one of the scarier symptoms that first surfaced after I got really sick with Lyme. It showed up within a month of being symptomatic and it was embarrassing and scary to say the least. I wouldn't understand what people were telling me, couldn't remember words, and definitely couldn't remember what people told me. Thankfully some of those things got better and disappeared with treatment/remission from Lyme. Sadly the memory stuff is still a problem which we found out last year was because I have mild brain damage. So sorry you deal with this crap too, I am especially sad that reading has been taken from you. I am an avid reader and gosh that breaks my heart. Thank you for this blog post!!!

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    1. Hello hunny, yes I just hope people read this and feel less alone as there are loads of us with this nasty symptom. When it first happened I thought I was the only one so it is lovely for me to know how many understand...Massive hugs Ness xxx

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  6. Grandma says i just need to slow down and it'll go away. I didn't know it was a fibro thing either. Odd. THankfully it hasn't happened at work, only at home. I'm in a call center so once it starts happening too much at work idk what i'll do.

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    1. Hello darling, yes it is one of the symptoms that I disliked most. I can handle pain but this does challenge me some days. Hope you listen to your Grandma and get loads of lovely rest when you are not in work. Fingers crossed it stays out of your work life. Love and hugs Ness xxx

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  7. Unfortunately, I get it from both Fibromyalgia and chronic daily migraine. It's definitely a struggle. AlwaysKeepFighting!

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    1. Hello Judi, I have chronic migraines also so maybe this is why mine is quite serve. It is a nightmare during the aura phase with me, I can seem almost drugged.
      Thank you so much for commenting and yes we definitely need to always keep fighting and supporting each other. Massive hugs Ness xx

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  8. I suffer from "brain fog" due to Fibromyalgia AND chronic daily migraine. It's definitely a struggle! Frustrating! Thanks for sharing! AlwaysKeepFighting!

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    1. Hello Judi, I have chronic migraines also so maybe this is why mine is quite serve. It is a nightmare during the aura phase with me, I can seem almost drugged.
      Thank you so much for commenting and yes we definitely need to always keep fighting and supporting each other. Massive hugs Ness xx

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